Statistik över cyklisters olyckor: faktaunderlag till gemensam strategi för säker cykling

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A total of 153 cyclists were killed between 2007 and 2012, while more than 44,000 were so badly injured that they were admitted to A&E departments. 8,400 of the injured cyclists were seriously injured and 1,100 very seriously injured. Half the serious injuries are injuries to the arms and shoulders. About 90% of all cycling accidents in which cyclists are seriously injured happen in urban areas. Eight of every ten cyclists seriously injured sustained their injuries in single-bicycle accidents, and just over one-tenth in bicycle-motor vehicle accidents. The majority, 69%, of cyclists killed, lost their lives in collisions with motor vehicles, usually cars. Given what are judged to be the underlying causes of bicycle accidents, improved ice removal and winter tyres for bikes are considered to be the measures with the biggest potential for reducing the number of cyclists seriously injured, as well as the use of a cycle helmet and a protective jacket and trousers. Other important accident prevention measures are the removal of loose grit, good surface maintenance and adjusted kerbstones, followed by segregated cycle paths, safe bicycle crossings/overpasses and the removing of fixed objects on and beside the cycle path. Many serious injuries to cyclists can also be avoided by remedy deficiencies on the bicycle or its equipment. The most important measures for reducing the number of cyclist fatalities are increased helmet use and the prevention of collisions with motor vehicles or a reduction of the violence of such collisions by means of segregation, safe bicycle crossings/overpasses, emergency brakes and/or an external air bag on cars, and, for lorries, a warning system alerting drivers to the presence of cyclists in the “dead angle”. The analyses presented in this report were undertaken on behalf of the Swedish Transport Administration, and forms part of the work to devise a policy strategy for safe cycling.

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