Samspel i trafiken: formella och informella regler bland cyklister

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Our understanding of cyclists’ behaviour in relation to rules and regulations are rather poor and the same applies to cyclists’ interaction with other road users. The purpose of this project was therefore to explore cyclists’ knowledge of traffic rules but also what determine their own compliance or noncompliance. Participants in the study were 612 people between 18 and 74 years from Gothenburg, Linköping and Stockholm and were recruited through a web panel. A survey was used which asked them about their background, view of themselves as cyclists, own self-compliance, view of others’ compliance, knowledge of rules and various factors that determine their intention to break the rules.

The results from the study showed that the participants’ regular knowledge was relatively good, at least in terms of behaviours that are prohibited. The participants who thought that a certain behaviour was forbidden also replied that they did this to a lesser extent. Cyclists who stated that they would like to arrive as soon as possible tended to choose more flexible routes (e.g. bike across pedestrian crossings, pavements and roads mainly used by vehicles), whether permitted or not. To a greater extent they also stated that they did not always stop at red lights or at stop signs. Cycle crossings, junctions, pedestrian crossings and pavements were used as examples of places/situations where the rules were considered unclear. Perceived behavioural control and attitude influenced the intention to behave according to three hypothetical scenarios which described how other road users had to break or swerve in order to avoid an accident with the cyclist. This meant that those who intended to behave in the manner indicated believed that it was easy and rather harmless, but also that it was both right and good. However, the most important factor was if they had performed the behaviour in the past, which in turn may have reinforced this view, that is if nothing serious had happened.

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25-27
Aug

ICTTP 2020

ICTTP, International Conference on Traffic and Transport Psychology, is postponed until August 2021.
13-14
Oct

Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis: European Conference 2020

VTI and Centre for Transport Studies (CTS) at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) organise Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis: European Conference 2020. 
4-6
Nov

International Cycling Safety Conference

Swedish Cycling Research Centre, Cykelcentrum, organises together with Lund University the International Cycling Safety Conference, ICSC, in Lund 4-6 November 2020.

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