Säker framkomlighet: sammanfattande resultat

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Urban Björketun
Arne Carlsson

The idea behind rumble strips, that is both shoulder rumble strips and median rumble strips, is to “awaken/alert” the driver who, due to inattention, fatigue or for some other reason, is involuntarily intersecting the median or side lane marker, and to thereby prevent single-vehicle accidents and multivehicle collisions. To prevent serious head-on collisions, ordinary 2-lane roads are rebuilt to meet free 2 +1 roads. This report presents results from the evaluation on two-lane roads with median milled rumble strips, divided roads, motorways with shoulder rumble strips and roads with oncoming traffic separation (referred to as sparse 2+1). Results from accident analyses (before-after study) on roads with median milled rumble strips show that the number of deaths and severe injuries has decreased by roughly 6 per cent. The corresponding decrease for single-vehicle accidents is 14 per cent. These results are significant. Speed measurements show no clear changes in terms of average speed after median rumble strips have been installed. With regard to lateral positioning, the results show that cars travel roughly 5 cm away from the centre line and that the variance of lateral position decreases slightly. This might lead to an increased rutting and wear. In the driver interviews that were conducted, 90 per cent of the drivers considered that median rumble strips contribute to higher traffic safety. With respect to external noise, one study shows that raising the guideline values for road traffic by 5 dB to 65 dB (outdoors) and 40 dB (indoors) in the same way that industrial noise has been addressed would result in a risk wherein the limit values would be exceeded at distances of less than 140 meters (outdoors) and 80 meters (indoors).

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