Roadside measurements of fine and ultrafine particles at a major road north of Gothenburg

Publisher's full text
Peter Molnár
Mattias Hallquist

Particle measurements were conducted at a road site 15km north of the city of Gothenburg for 3 weeks in June 2000. The size distribution between 10 and 368nm was measured continuously by using a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) system. PM2.5 was sampled on a daily basis with subsequent elemental analysis using EDXRF-spectroscopy. The road is a straight four-lane road with a speed limit of 90kph. The road passing the site is flat with no elevations where the vehicles run on a steady workload and with constant speed. The traffic intensity is about 20,000 cars per workday and 13,000 vehicles per day during weekends. The diesel fuel used in Sweden is low in sulphur content (<10ppm) and therefore the diesel vehicles passing the site contribute less to particle emissions in comparison with other studies. A correlation between PM2.5 and accumulation mode particles (100-368nm) was observed. However, no significant correlation was found between number concentrations of ultrafine particles (10-100nm) and PM2.5 or the accumulation mode number concentration. The particle distribution between 10 and 368nm showed great dependency on wind speed and wind direction, where the wind speed was the dominant factor for ultrafine (10-100nm) particle concentrations. The difference in traffic intensity between workday and weekend together with wind data made it possible to single out the traffic contribution to particle emissions and measure the size distribution. The results presented in combination with previous studies show that both PM2.5 and the mass of accumulation mode particles are bad estimates for ultrafine particles.

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