Män och kvinnor i trafiken: en litteraturstudie

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Hans-Åke Cedersund
Catharina Lewin

The object of the project "Men and women in traffic - A literature review" has been to enhance knowledge of the different factors that influence the attitudes of men and women to their cars, car ownership and driving. This project is intended to be the first part of a larger project. The results from this literature review will form the basis for the design of the other parts of the project. In summary, men and women travel, on average, about equally often and spend almost the same amount of time travelling, but men travel and, above all, drive much more than women. In principle, this applies to all transport scenarios but is most evident in the case of journeys to work and business trips. Women make far more journeys that are related to driving others, e.g. taking children to and from school. Far fewer elderly women than elderly men and younger women have driving licenses. Elderly men have greater access to cars and keep on driving to an older age than women. On the whole, responsibility for children has a great effect on travel behaviour, especially that of women, but it is only to a certain extent that the large differences can be explained in socioeconomic terms. One is forced to the conclusion that men and women quite simply do not have the same type of relationship to the car. Many men take the car for granted, as something that solves all transport problems. In contrast, women more easily appreciate that there are other options apart from the car and are more likely to make use of these in practice. It is almost impossible to try to explain why men and women have such different attitudes to cars. Most explanations are indirect, for instance that women have a greater responsibility for children and the household, and do not really answer the question. The car must therefore continue to be regarded as a classic masculine arena, even though changes can be discerned.

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