Hjulburna oskyddade trafikanter på landsväg

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The background to this collection of three sub-studies; 1) Two-minus-one bicycle lanes on rural roads, 2) How close is close? and 3) Pilot study on road friction testing for motorcycles, is to highlight any problems that two-wheeled unprotected road users have on Swedish roads. Studies 1 and 2 are about cyclists on country roads, while study 3 is about motorcyclists. Study 1 is a survey of a new road design, two-minus-one rural roads. Study 2 is an experimental study that highlights the issue of the width of a cycle path/hard-shoulder from the perspective of the cyclist. Study 3 is friction measurements carried out on a measurement method that is more adapted to the situation of motorcyclists. The three sub-studies resulted in the following recommendations: i) stretches of rural roads that are intended to be two-minus-one rural roads should be chosen carefully and in places where sight-lines are obscured (by hedgerows, topography, etc.), alternative solutions should be considered. ii) The speed limitation on the two-minus-one rural roads should not exceed 50 km/h. In order to reduce speeding, signage in combination with surveillance and/or infrastructure measures should be considered to reduce speed violations. iii) The introduction of two-minus-one rural roads should be done in dialogue with local populations and preceded by information efforts so that everyone knows what rules apply. iv) A single carriageway cycle path/hard-shoulder on a two-minus-one rural road with mixed traffic should be at least 120 cm laterally from the middle of the bicycle path to the motor vehicles’ carriageway. v) Friction measurements should be linked to the driver's experience of grip. vi) Develops a measurement method/protocol for friction testing where the measurement section is ≥ 1 m in different levels of wetness on the roadway, which can also be used to evaluate blackspots on road sections that are linked to “temporary” road repairs.

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