Drivers’ Intention to Comply with The Speed Limit in School Zones, in Malaysia

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Suhaila Abdul Hanan
Mark J. King
Ioni M. Lewis

There has been an increasing number of fatal road crashes in Malaysia in the last two decades. Among those who die on Malaysian roads are children aged 0 to 18 years (i.e., 15.5% in 2009). The involvement of children in road trauma, and particularly children when they are in and around school zones, generates concern among the general public. The present study utilised an extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) framework, incorporating the additional predictors of mindfulness and habit, to understand drivers’ intention to comply with the school zone speed limit (SZSL). The study aimed to examine the extent to which TPB constructs, and additional predictors of mindfulness and habit, predicted drivers’ behavioural intention to comply with the SZSL. Malaysian drivers (N = 210) participated in this study via an online survey. Hierarchical regression was conducted, and the results showed that attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and habit were significant predictors of intention to comply with the SZSL. Specifically, drivers who expressed more positive attitudes towards compliance, greater belief that significant others would want them to comply, and more confidence in their control of their speed were more likely to report an intention to comply. These drivers appear to have developed a positive habit of compliance, which may simply be a result of the engineering measures in place around school zones in Malaysia. Mindfulness was not a significant predictor in the final model. These findings provide some support for the explanatory value of the extended TPB framework in understanding the factors influencing drivers’ intention to comply with the SZSL. The present study also provides information of potential value in the development of interventions, such as public education and mass media campaigns, aimed at improving drivers’ compliance with the SZSL.

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